Mother Nature’s Chuckle: The Language of the Universe is not English


Miraculous opportunity for self-reflection.

 

There it is. Our home. To us it seems like such a huge place where we will never meet all our neighbors. A place where we live our daily lives consumed with news and opinions from all directions. We work. We play. We do silly stuff like fight wars or think we are the best at this sport or that.

Now look at the picture. Could you spot ‘us’ without the circle? As the dominant species on our planet, we think we are on top. We can explore our Moon. We can travel to our neighbor planet with robots. It is said the human brain is the most complex piece of matter in the known universe.

All Mother Nature can do is chuckle.

As the above image easily shows, it is all about perspective. Our grandeur is self-inflated. Despite the best efforts and actions of us on Earth, Mother Nature will always have the upper hand. She gives us room to explore. She allows us to make strides, great and small. But inevitably, she always reminds us we can not walk confidently on our journey. Stellar threats are all around; invisible until the time of their death in our black or blue sky. Prehistoric mass extinctions to modern day injuries and destruction in Russia last year.

Mother Nature does not speak any of our earthly language. She only speaks the language of the universe. The language we wish to learn through our research and study. The language we long to understand for it will tell us our true history…from the beginning.

On this International Women’s Day, remember, we are all very important to ourselves. However, our great Mother still laughs at us.

 

 

 

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How to Submit to Abstract 2.0


I’m very glad to finally initiate Abstract 2.0. I hope this resource will be of great help to anyone willing to utilize it.

For now, I have set up a separate website for the submission and archiving of abstracts by those who contribute. The website is here at http://abstracts20.blogspot.com.

Here is an example of a re-written abstract:

Colleen T. O’Loughlin, Laura C. Miller, Albert Siryaporn, Knut Drescher, Martin F. Semmelhack, and Bonnie L. Bassler (2013) 110:17981–17986, doi:10.1073/pnas.1316981110

 A quorum-sensing inhibitor blocks Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence and biofilm formation

 Quorum sensing is a way a bacterium communicates to the cells around it to regulate behavior of the community as a whole. This process occurs in harmless bacteria as well as pathogens. One such pathogen, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, uses quorum sensing to attack its host in a concerted effort by all the cells present and to control how the cells ‘stick’ together once infecting the host. In an effort to prevent P. aeruginosa attack and infection, researchers tested synthetic molecules to identify those which block cells from receiving the attack message. One such molecule, meta-bromo-thiolactone (mBTL), succeeded in blocking the message and protected a roundworm model system and human lung cells from dying due to infection. The paper also discusses how mBTL works at the molecular level. The results from this study could help control complications in cystic fibrosis and hospital infections due to contaminated equipment.

Abstract 2.0 Is On: Help Wanted


I have sat on this long enough. It’s not like a have anything else going on right now (except the birth of a son in a  month, syllabus to write, classes to prepare, evaluations to do, data to journal, …). Introducing:

Abstract 2.0

Here are the details presently. I and anyone willing to help will scour the journals of our respective fields and choose those we feel need to be disseminated to the larger public. In a short synopsis (abstract if you will), an overview of the article and why it is important will be written and deposited here. Details will be worked out on how to submit the abstracts in the near future.

Now is the time to act (or later if now is not convenient)!

The Science Bubble


The following link is profound. The current issue of EdgeScience takes a brilliant look at how the current era in science is more about rushing technology to market to benefit society than the underlying universal truths that must first be studied. The consequences have been strikingly similar to the ‘Housing Bubble’ and may not have fully burst yet.

Please take a look:

www.scientificexploration.org/edgescience/edgescience_17.pdf.

STORYTELLING IN SCIENCE: THE CELL AS YOUR FAVORITE RESTAURANT PART III


<img alt="Storytelling in science visualized through bacteria"      src=http://"open-for-business.png">?w=660
Storytelling in Science visualized

Perhaps a running list of metaphors so far:

Restaurant: bacterial cell

Building: cell membrane

Doors: channels and transporters

Patrons: metabolites/compounds/substrates and products

Employees: proteins/enzymes

Managers: two-component proteins to regulate gene transcription

Employee list: genome

Copy machine: DNA replication machinery

So, in the last part our restaurant was going great and we opened up a new restaurant with the same employee list among other things. The two restaurants are now independent of each other and are free to act accordingly.

What if things change and times are not going as well? The overall number of patrons drastically decreases, not enough electricity (ATP) to run the restaurant or running water (redox potential)? What if disaster is about to strike? How can the restaurant prepare all the managers, employees, the building, the doors, the patrons for it?

Luckily the restaurant has a monitoring system that can quickly make sure the restaurant will be ready for anything that comes its way. The monitoring system can take snapshots of all data generated by the restaurant: power supply, water supply, patron count, employee count, conditions outside the restaurant like weather or competing restaurants. The monitoring system is the bacterial second messenger systems. With the support of the managers, the monitoring system can instantaneously keep track of all variables and make changes as needed.

The system is detecting the start of a drought. This drought will lower the number of patrons coming and going from the restaurant. The drought will also change the available electricity and water supply of the restaurant. The monitoring system sounds the alarm, a message is sent over the intercom for all the managers and employees to hear and react to. The intercom message alerts some managers to call in additional employees while telling others to stop their work. Some employees take on a new job in preparation for the drought. The intercom message is the bacterial second messenger cyclic-di-GMP. The entire restaurant begins preparations for the drought so it can survive until better times are present. Other than changes to managers and employees, some new employees are called in to prepare the building itself. Perhaps to change the number of doors. The employees may also change the exterior of the building to better withstand the drought like changing a wood exterior to a brick or stucco one. The brick or stucco are the exopolysaccharides, complex sugars on the exterior of the cell that can serve as protection or to help cells adhere to each other to ride out the hard times together. 

When times change, the restaurant has to be able to change with them. That is why these restaurants have been in business for ~3 billion years and still going strong.