Mother Nature’s Chuckle: The Language of the Universe is not English


Miraculous opportunity for self-reflection.

 

There it is. Our home. To us it seems like such a huge place where we will never meet all our neighbors. A place where we live our daily lives consumed with news and opinions from all directions. We work. We play. We do silly stuff like fight wars or think we are the best at this sport or that.

Now look at the picture. Could you spot ‘us’ without the circle? As the dominant species on our planet, we think we are on top. We can explore our Moon. We can travel to our neighbor planet with robots. It is said the human brain is the most complex piece of matter in the known universe.

All Mother Nature can do is chuckle.

As the above image easily shows, it is all about perspective. Our grandeur is self-inflated. Despite the best efforts and actions of us on Earth, Mother Nature will always have the upper hand. She gives us room to explore. She allows us to make strides, great and small. But inevitably, she always reminds us we can not walk confidently on our journey. Stellar threats are all around; invisible until the time of their death in our black or blue sky. Prehistoric mass extinctions to modern day injuries and destruction in Russia last year.

Mother Nature does not speak any of our earthly language. She only speaks the language of the universe. The language we wish to learn through our research and study. The language we long to understand for it will tell us our true history…from the beginning.

On this International Women’s Day, remember, we are all very important to ourselves. However, our great Mother still laughs at us.

 

 

 

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Abstract 2.0 Is On: Help Wanted


I have sat on this long enough. It’s not like a have anything else going on right now (except the birth of a son in a  month, syllabus to write, classes to prepare, evaluations to do, data to journal, …). Introducing:

Abstract 2.0

Here are the details presently. I and anyone willing to help will scour the journals of our respective fields and choose those we feel need to be disseminated to the larger public. In a short synopsis (abstract if you will), an overview of the article and why it is important will be written and deposited here. Details will be worked out on how to submit the abstracts in the near future.

Now is the time to act (or later if now is not convenient)!

The Science Bubble


The following link is profound. The current issue of EdgeScience takes a brilliant look at how the current era in science is more about rushing technology to market to benefit society than the underlying universal truths that must first be studied. The consequences have been strikingly similar to the ‘Housing Bubble’ and may not have fully burst yet.

Please take a look:

www.scientificexploration.org/edgescience/edgescience_17.pdf.

A STEM Book Explaining Bacteria to Kids: Begging Without the Cardboard Sign


I was recently approached about developing a children’s book to educate about bacteria in hopes of clarifying misconceptions many have about ‘nasty germs’. I must say how amazed and honored by the invitation I am. The company is small without a lot of capital to produce such a book at will. So, I was asked if I had contacts that would graciously sponsor the production of the book. This to me is bittersweet. I would love to be a part of something that would be so helpful for the public regarding the reality of microbes (they tend to get bad press in general). However, I’m not one to ask for money…ever. 

This has sparked questions in my head about the state of educational media production. S.T.E.M. is all the rage these days and rightly so. As our society progresses, the need for a workforce trained for technical and scientific positions is essential. One example…billboard signs. Growing up, I used to get excited and amazed when I saw a person putting up a new billboard sign. Taking the old one off, applying the new one in its place. However, now these signs are replaced by digital billboards. Who is going to change the billboard advertisement? Someone trained to tear down the old and glue the new one on? Someone with a background in electrical engineering? If there is a problem with the billboard, who will fix it? A carpenter or an engineer? This is just one example. 

The STEM push is necessary and welcome in my opinion. However, a quite fitting phrase comes to mind: show me the money. We are throwing money into public school systems that are fueled by bureaucracy and inefficiency. Yet we still have to cut out box tops to support local schools and have several fundraisers a year for a new gym floor. Anyone see the irony?

Put the money where it can be useful. Put it in projects that will encourage our children to pursue a career that will promote curiosity and critical thinking. This has been my soapbox, today sponsored by the letters S, T, E, and M.

Telling the Scientific Method Story


science art, storytelling in science, science in society
The scientific method as a bucket filled with Mother Nature’s water with an ever -changing hue.

The science gap is huge. One of the biggest misconceptions hindering the advancement of scientific literacy in society is also one of the most crucial – the scientific method. And no wonder. Most people would look back at primary and secondary school and cringe when thinking about all the facts and concepts they had to memorize in science classes. I cringe when I think of the public concluding science is static and just the sum of all data gathered through the centuries.

The scientific method is dynamic and so is the collection of accepted scientific knowledge

Nothing in science is certain. In the words of the great Richard Feynman:

We absolutely must leave room for doubt or there is no progress and no learning. There is no learning without having to pose a question. And a question requires doubt. People search for certainty. But there is no certainty. People are terrified — how can you live and not know? It is not odd at all. You only think you know, as a matter of fact. And most of your actions are based on incomplete knowledge…

The idea that scientific knowledge is like a statue is a horrible, infectious disease in society. Consider this…

The scientific method is a bucket. This is not just any bucket; it holds all the scientific knowledge gathered throughout history. The bucket is just a utilitarian tool for collecting knowledge. Luckily, this bucket has a hole in the bottom. The scientific method is a two way street and is objective just like a bucket is just a bucket. At the beginning of it all, the bucket was filled with crystal clear water. Mother Nature had filled it for us but all its contents were a complete unknown. As human inquiry began, discoveries were like drops of color that allowed us to have a glimpse of the contents as it dispersed like food coloring in a glass of water. Each new discovery or observation adds a touch of color to the bucket. Nature’s true color will not be observed in our lifetime or possibly at all. Our curiosity and practice only adds to the hue within the bucket.

Sometimes we don’t know the hue of the water is wrong until new knowledge is obtained and added to the large bucket. With addition of the new color, drops of discolored water pour from the hole in the bucket. Soon the prevailing knowledge is uniform within the bucket. Science never sleeps so this constant increase in knowledge and data get us one step closer to the true color of the universe, or so we think until we find out the hue is all wrong as the hole opens and a novel color drops in.

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