A STEM Book Explaining Bacteria to Kids: Begging Without the Cardboard Sign


I was recently approached about developing a children’s book to educate about bacteria in hopes of clarifying misconceptions many have about ‘nasty germs’. I must say how amazed and honored by the invitation I am. The company is small without a lot of capital to produce such a book at will. So, I was asked if I had contacts that would graciously sponsor the production of the book. This to me is bittersweet. I would love to be a part of something that would be so helpful for the public regarding the reality of microbes (they tend to get bad press in general). However, I’m not one to ask for money…ever. 

This has sparked questions in my head about the state of educational media production. S.T.E.M. is all the rage these days and rightly so. As our society progresses, the need for a workforce trained for technical and scientific positions is essential. One example…billboard signs. Growing up, I used to get excited and amazed when I saw a person putting up a new billboard sign. Taking the old one off, applying the new one in its place. However, now these signs are replaced by digital billboards. Who is going to change the billboard advertisement? Someone trained to tear down the old and glue the new one on? Someone with a background in electrical engineering? If there is a problem with the billboard, who will fix it? A carpenter or an engineer? This is just one example. 

The STEM push is necessary and welcome in my opinion. However, a quite fitting phrase comes to mind: show me the money. We are throwing money into public school systems that are fueled by bureaucracy and inefficiency. Yet we still have to cut out box tops to support local schools and have several fundraisers a year for a new gym floor. Anyone see the irony?

Put the money where it can be useful. Put it in projects that will encourage our children to pursue a career that will promote curiosity and critical thinking. This has been my soapbox, today sponsored by the letters S, T, E, and M.

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Science: Solving Mysteries One Clue at a Time


This past Tuesday, something mysterious and amazing happened. My wife noticed a strange deposit into our bank account; a large deposit: $1,400. She asked when I was supposed to be paid for something I was working on and I told her not until later. This deposit piqued both our curiosities. What was it? Why was it in there? Who put it there? I started investigating; researching as much as I could. I was able to find out it was $1,400 cash, which bank branch and what time the money was put in. Paranoid it was some scam perpetrated to clean out our bank account, my wife wanted me to call the bank to inquire. So, Wednesday morning, I called. Long story short, my wife received a call Wednesday afternoon from a bank employee saying someone anonymously deposited money in our account because they thought we should have it. What? To say the least, we were humbled and astonished. The curiosity has not gone away. We are still trying to figure out who this saint(s) is.

This mystery made me think; it is eerily like the field of science. The path to discovery in any science discipline begins with something very simple, an observation. My wife observed a strange deposit into our bank account. Observations lead to curiosity and ultimately yield questions. What was this deposit? Why was it there? Who put it there? Explanations or answers to the questions are developed. These explanations, or hypotheses, have their validity tested through experiment or some action. My wife’s initial explanation was that someone deposited it to somehow gain access to our account to clean it out. My action of calling the bank to report the deposit as not originating from the wife or myself was partly to make sure the deposit was legitimate and not some clever scam. Through experiment or action, facts are gathered to support the explanations or rule them out. The fact a bank employee called to let us know the deposit was from an anonymous ‘Good Samaritan’ ruled out the hypothesis of the scam. Scientific discovery ultimately leads to more observations, curiosity, questions, and hypotheses.

For my wife and I, the discovery that someone thought so highly of us to give us any amount of money has only fueled the mystery. The main question now is, who did it? Unlike any good mystery, or science for that matter, we may never find out.

This post is dedicated to my family’s ‘Good Samaritan’. Thank you…

My Dream for Science Literacy: Abstracts 2.0


I have been wondering for some time: How can I make the biggest impact to science literacy (This was a start). However, I know I can do more.

Science Literacy

I received my weekly email of the Table of Contents for one of my favorite journals PNAS today and read over the titles of the articles. As usual, I’m reading them and saying in my head, blah blah blah because I am looking for certain keywords to identify the article as something I would be interested in (like chemotaxis or second messenger cyclic-di-GMP). Then it occurred to me,

I’m trained to know what these titles mean and which ones would interest me. What about everyone else in America? To them it’s just blah blah blah without the training to know if they would like the research or not. 

A majority of published scientific research is federally funded by taxpayer dollars in the U.S. yet most taxpayers have no idea why the research findings from these funds are important or how they contribute to a better society.

What if the article abstracts, laced with big words and jargon, were rewritten to a level where most people could understand; an abstract 2.o if you will? By reading a short summary of the work, anyone who wanted to know could actually understand the problem studied and the results. Maybe more importantly, the reader would not have to rely on interpretations of the research from popular media sources that have higher priorities than educating the public.

I will have more on this concept in the near future. Please let me know what you think and add comments and suggestions.

Professor 2.0


Professor 2.0.

Page added to my blog after being contacted by a tenured professor at Virginia Tech about how to enter the crowded world of social networks to increase public knowledge of their research and increase its impact.

First Order of Business When Rich: One Microscope Per Child


animated GIF bacteria, animated GIF, microbiology
Azospirillum brasilense cells swimming in an oxygen gradient. Magnified 40X

It is really sad humans (that seem so determined to destroy this planet) show little regard to the majority of species, most of which are invisible to the naked eye. Most people go through life without knowing the splendor of Mother Nature in all its glory.

It’s hard to believe now the accepted knowledge of society before invention of the microscope around 1590 by Zacharias Janssen (disputed). Everyone had  to rely on their own eyes, while exquisite in their own right, but these are only reliable down to the size of a human hair width. Imagine a world where flies and maggots were thought to spontaneously generate from items such as rotting meat. This was the common knowledge and understanding. After human observation was enhanced by wonderful inventions such as the compound microscope, only then could the true understanding of all things small or distant be studied in acceptable depth.

Imagine if you will looking through a microscope for the first time. You have been told, and believe, you live in a clean world in which if you can’t see it, it does not exist. With true curiosity and virgin eyes, you place a drop of water on a small glass slide and focus upon it with a microscope. Small particles that appear to be moving as if they were swimming come into view. Suddenly, your whole world changes. At the intersection of ignorance and knowledge, powerful things happen.

Today, microscopes have evolved and improved to the point where we can visualize hydrogen bonds in molecules at the atomic scale. The invention of the electron microscope helped usher in the field of virology just as Antonie van Leeuwenhoek did so much for microbiology with his improvements to the light microscope. The gifted van Leeuwenhoek discovered red blood cells, cell vacuoles, and bacteria (among other things). Thanks to him, the use of a microscope became a useful technique in various types of research.

It is said that ignorance is bliss. However, I believe ignorance is…ignorance. The less a person knows and understands, the smaller their world and the less their ability to imagine and perceive new ideas. Seeing is believing and what better way to see beyond your means than with a microscope.

Now, imagine giving this enormous ability to see the unexplainable to the most curious and imaginative of us, children. Their innate curiosity and unobstructed ability to use their imagination makes the power of the microscope exponentially greater. Giving a child this portal to the unseen opens their eyes to endless possibilities, probing questions, and the ability to answer the questions themselves.

I support the One Laptop Per Child movement. Opening up the entire world of information to a child can open up new possibilities and lead to a better life. The laptop opens the world to the child, but a microscope opens the child’s world in which they live. The knowledge gained is not flat and two dimensional; it is in real 3D.

Yeah, when I’m rich, One Microscope Per Child is my first action.