First Order of Business When Rich: One Microscope Per Child


animated GIF bacteria, animated GIF, microbiology
Azospirillum brasilense cells swimming in an oxygen gradient. Magnified 40X

It is really sad humans (that seem so determined to destroy this planet) show little regard to the majority of species, most of which are invisible to the naked eye. Most people go through life without knowing the splendor of Mother Nature in all its glory.

It’s hard to believe now the accepted knowledge of society before invention of the microscope around 1590 by Zacharias Janssen (disputed). Everyone had  to rely on their own eyes, while exquisite in their own right, but these are only reliable down to the size of a human hair width. Imagine a world where flies and maggots were thought to spontaneously generate from items such as rotting meat. This was the common knowledge and understanding. After human observation was enhanced by wonderful inventions such as the compound microscope, only then could the true understanding of all things small or distant be studied in acceptable depth.

Imagine if you will looking through a microscope for the first time. You have been told, and believe, you live in a clean world in which if you can’t see it, it does not exist. With true curiosity and virgin eyes, you place a drop of water on a small glass slide and focus upon it with a microscope. Small particles that appear to be moving as if they were swimming come into view. Suddenly, your whole world changes. At the intersection of ignorance and knowledge, powerful things happen.

Today, microscopes have evolved and improved to the point where we can visualize hydrogen bonds in molecules at the atomic scale. The invention of the electron microscope helped usher in the field of virology just as Antonie van Leeuwenhoek did so much for microbiology with his improvements to the light microscope. The gifted van Leeuwenhoek discovered red blood cells, cell vacuoles, and bacteria (among other things). Thanks to him, the use of a microscope became a useful technique in various types of research.

It is said that ignorance is bliss. However, I believe ignorance is…ignorance. The less a person knows and understands, the smaller their world and the less their ability to imagine and perceive new ideas. Seeing is believing and what better way to see beyond your means than with a microscope.

Now, imagine giving this enormous ability to see the unexplainable to the most curious and imaginative of us, children. Their innate curiosity and unobstructed ability to use their imagination makes the power of the microscope exponentially greater. Giving a child this portal to the unseen opens their eyes to endless possibilities, probing questions, and the ability to answer the questions themselves.

I support the One Laptop Per Child movement. Opening up the entire world of information to a child can open up new possibilities and lead to a better life. The laptop opens the world to the child, but a microscope opens the child’s world in which they live. The knowledge gained is not flat and two dimensional; it is in real 3D.

Yeah, when I’m rich, One Microscope Per Child is my first action.

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3 thoughts on “First Order of Business When Rich: One Microscope Per Child”

  1. Great idea – looking at an interesting sample through a decent microscope can be life-changing. Seeing a bit of microbial mat through a phase-contrast microscope for the first time is completely mind-blowing. But they have to be decent microscopes – phase contrast – I’ve never seen an inexpensive children’s microscope that can do phase contrast, have you? That’s definitely an important feature for the microscopes you hand out once you’re rich.

    1. Totally agree. A phase contrast would be optimal, but I think a light microscope would be more practical for kids. My 5yo daughter received two microscopes for Christmas: one pocket size and an iTikes. We are both enjoying them!

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