In honor of Halloween: Bat aureus


One of the scariest of all bacterial species, Bat aureus!

bacteria art, science art, sciart, science, microbiology
The wretched Bat aureus.

(also a preview of an upcoming post)…

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Never send for whom the budget tolls, it tolls for thee: an open letter Part III.


During the current political environment, R&D budgets are being reduced or frozen. For example, the budget for NIH, the largest public funding program in the U.S., is lower than it was in 2003. The “Plan B” outlined in the Budget Control Act of 2011 (aka sequester) plus the current 6-month continuing resolution cycle employed by Congress has all in the research community scared; not only for their own jobs but also for what it is saying to our citizens and people across the globe.  Our ‘leaders’ in Washington no longer consider basic research a priority. In essence, the ‘leaders’ are saying, “We are too worried about our re-election bids to see the big picture and the catastrophic consequences of our short-sightedness”.

The innovations and technologies directly or indirectly resulting from basic research have brought invaluable prosperity to this country and has enriched the lives of each of us directly. Cuts to research are the essentially the same as cuts to flesh. Eventually, the infection at the cut spreads to the entire body. The cut doesn’t suffer, the body suffers. John Donne said it well in his passage, Meditation 17 Devotions Upon Emergent Occasions:

No man is an island,  entire of itself; every man is a piece of the continent, a part of the main; if a clod be washed away by the sea, Europe is the less, as well as if a promontory were, as well as if a manor of thy friend’s or of thine own were;  any man’s death diminishes me, because I am involved in mankind, and therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls; it tolls for thee.

The bell is tolling in the U.S. and has for some time now. We all suffer when ignoring our research community.

 

Sincerely,

Matt Russell, Ph.D.

Never send for whom the budget tolls, it tolls for thee: an open letter Part II.


The sixty years between World War II and September 11, 2001 were unparalleled for discovery and innovation even though they were fueled by fear. First, fear of Japan, Germany, and later Russia. After the war was over, a new ominous threat emerged that (in the eyes of most) threatened our future as a country if not defeated, communism. ‘Necessity breeds invention’ sure was true during the Cold War and our Research & Development infrastructure became the envy of other countries.

On the tragic day 2,977 innocent lives died, our nation changed. We awoke to a new, hidden enemy with no country boundaries. It brought us together like nothing before. We were united. But some quickly turned to ideology and misinformation leading us into constant military offenses with no real way to fund them. One of the first schemes was by increasing the maximum allowable interest rate of student loans. Personally, mine went from 2% to 6% overnight.

science funding
R&D spending initially rose after 2001. However, this is due to mostly an increase in Defense Department R&D budget increases.

Later on, other sources were needed to continue funding war campaigns. Although most of this funding was borrowed against our future generations, the rest came from discretionary spending. One of the major spending bills is that for science R&D and energy R&D. When the Human Genome Project was completed in April 2003, America’s largest scientific spending project in history was over. Instead of using these funds for other science and technology programs, no other big science project has ever come to fruition (the Spallation Neutron Source began construction prior to 9-11-01).

Never send to know for whom the budget tolls, it tolls for thee: an open letter Part I.


To whom it may concern,

This letter is for any and all that have a genuine interest in the future of our country. Many whose livelihood and passion dwells under the umbrella of Research & Development have watched helplessly over the past decade a deterioration in the enterprise that has made the United States the most successful global leader in the history of civilization. This enterprise emerged from one of the darkest tragedies in our nation’s history on December 7, 1941. With great foresight, our leaders knew resilience and ultimately the preservation of our way of life depended not upon naive belief but creativity and innovation among the brightest minds in the country; themselves immigrants brought here by persecution. 

Beginning with the Manhattan Project, the U.S. has built unchallenged scientific leadership. The unfortunate irony is that another dark tragedy on September 11, 2001 started its slow downward spiral.